New Hampshire State Flag NH

The 9th state, admitted 1788

Although the general design used on New Hampshiress flag had been in use since 1784, it became official in 1909, with slight changes made in 1931.  The New Hampshire state seal is the focus of this flag, depicting an optimistic rising sun behind the Raleigh, which was a ship built for use in the Revolutionary War.  The seal is surrounded by a laurel wreath. The wreath is an ancient symbol of fame, honor, and victory.  The nine stars within the wreath show that New Hampshire was the ninth state to join the Union.  The water stands for the harbor of Portsmouth, and in the lower left corner is granite, a strong and sturdy rock, representing the New Hampshire/s rugged landscape and the sturdy character of the people.  New Hampshire’s nickname is the Granite State. New Hampshire State Flag Adopted:  1909

The changes to the state seal made in 1931 created a problem for flag makers at the time, How do we put another color into the flag.  Flag making was screened at the time and adding another color, silver, was difficult.  Some manufactures left in out completely disregarding the change but others added the extra step.  Today, manufactures use a dying process that allows them to recreate the state flag of New Hampshire accurately.

The present day flag with the granite boulder can be purchased at quality full service flag stores like Flag-works over America in Concord NH.  The flags range in size from 4”x6” to 10’X15’ however the most common size in the 3’x5’, perfect for flying at home or your business.  New Hampshire flags can be supplied in either heavy duty nylon or 2 ply woven polyester.  Both can withstand the harsh New England weather that NH has to offer.

 
 
 

» recent comments

» archives

» meta