Tag Archives: state flags

American Nylon Flags on Sale!!

American Flags On Sale Now

3×5′ = $24.95 + FREE SHIPPING!! 
AMERICAN FLAGS – Over 50 Sizes and Options!!!

The Nylon American FlagThis brilliant, heavyweight nylon American flag is the most versatile and longest lasting nylon American flag available.   The full filled embroidered stars and beautifully sewn stripes display a strong sense of pride.  This combination of strength and brilliant display, along with its quick-drying ability, make our American Flags suitable for a wide range of applications.  The lightweight and close weave enable it to fly in the slightest breeze, giving the fullest visual effect. Our American flags history or American flags through the years can be found at American flags of the past.All our American Flags are 100% American Made  

Alaska State Flag

         Hi Folks Patrick Page here with Flag-Works over America How are you doing today.  I’m here today to talk about the Alaska state flag   More than 30 years before Alaska  became a state, they held a design contest for a flag.  A seventh grade Aleut student, John Bell Benson  known as Benny won that contest. the design had a blue background to represent the sky and the Forget-me-not flower.

On that background were placed eight gold stars to represent the Big Dipper and the North Star.

The Big Dipper forms part of the constellation Ursa Major or Great Bear; symbolizing strength.  The North Star is the perfect representation for the future state of Alaska, it being the most northerly state in the Union.

This simple design was adopted by the Alaska Territorial Legislature in  May, 1927  So Benny for winning the contest received a gold watch with the flag engraved on it and  had a Thousand dollars applied to his schooling to become an diesel mechanic.    Benny was also scheduled to present the flag to President Calvin Coolidge, but never made it.  So in 1959, When Alaska become apart of the United States,  Benny’s design became the official Alaska State flag  Please visit flag-works.com for your Alaska State flag and all your other flag needs

Coming Soon To Our Stock! Thin Blue Line US.

Flag-Works Over America is proud to announce the Newest Flag in our stock! The 3×5 Thin Blue Line US has been placed in our inventory in honor of the fallen officers in America and all over the world. Our hearts and prayers are with the families and friends.   Thank you all who serve us to keep our freedom free! God Bless.

Blue Thin Line US (1)

Washington State Flag

washington flag

The flag of the State of Washington consists of the state seal (which bears an image of George Washington) on a field of dark green. It is the only U.S. state flag with a field of green as well as the only state flag with the image of an American president.

In honor of George Washington, the first President of the United States, who was born on February 22, 1732. Colloquially, it is widely known as Presidents Day and is often an occasion to remember all the presidents, not just George Washington or Abraham Lincoln, whose birthday is also in February. The term”Presidents Day” was coined in a deliberate attempt to change the holiday into one honoring multiple presidents.

If you are looking for a Washington State flag, Flag-Works has sizes that range from 4″ x 6″ and larger. Visit our website or come into the retail store. Made in the USA

New Mexico Flag

NM

New Mexico was not officially recorded until the arrival of the Conquistadors, who encountered Native American Pueblos when they explored the area in the 16th century. Since that time, the area has been under the control of Spain, Mexico, and the United States, which took over in 1848. The long territorial period lasted until 1912. New Mexico became the 47th state in the US on 01/06/1912. During World War II, New Mexico was the site of the top-secret Manhattan Project, in which top U.S. scientists raced to create the first atomic bomb, which was tested at the Trinity Bomb site, near Alamagordo, on July 16, 1945.

An archaeologist, Dr. Harry Mera, designed this flag, which was adopted with urging by the Daughters of the American Revolution.  The colors of red and yellow recall the Spanish rule in the 17th century.  The symbol is that of the ancient Zia people, part of the Pueblo tribe located on the north bank of the James River.  It represents the belief of the Zias that the Giver of All Good Gifts gave in groups of four – four directions, four seasons, four times of the day and four states of life.  All these are connected by a circle of life and love, which is without beginning or end.


These top quality New Mexico Flags are made from heavy-duty, commercial grade outdoor 100% Nylon fabric for maximum durability. All flags are finished with strong heading and solid brass grommets for displaying. Made in the USA.

Order yours today on our website flag-works.com or come into our retail store.

 

No Internet Sales Tax Collected Here!

Flag-Works over America  would like to let all of our customers and future customers know that we do not and will not charge a sales tax when you buy a flag from us.  We are a New Hampshire company which has no sales tax. That’s the New Hampshire advantage!  When it comes to flags we have no other locations in any other state so we will not have to collect a sales tax for them. Any one want to buy a flag no sales tax and no shipping costs? Visit our website for free shipping or order by phone and only pay a flat fee of $6.95, whether you buy one or ten flags.

November 2, 1889

North Dakota the 39th state and South Dakota the 40th state became part of the Union on November 2, 1889. Because both wanted to be the first state admitted, President Benjamin Harrison shuffled both statehood papers and signed then without knowing which one was first. However, because North Dakota is alphabetically before South Dakota, its proclamation was published first.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flag-Works ship most flags for Free with our on-line store. We carry flag sizes that range from 4″ x 6″ thru 12′ x 18′. Made in the USA

Sep 17, 1787: U.S. Constitution signed

The Constitution of the United States of America is signed by 38 of 41 delegates present at the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Supporters of the document waged a hard-won battle to win ratification by the necessary nine out of 13 U.S. states.

The Articles of Confederation, ratified several months before the British surrender at Yorktown in 1781, provided for a loose confederation of U.S. states, which were sovereign in most of their affairs. On paper, Congress–the central authority–had the power to govern foreign affairs, conduct war, and regulate currency, but in practice these powers were sharply limited because Congress was given no authority to enforce its requests to the states for money or troops. By 1786, it was apparent that the Union would soon break up if the Articles of Confederation were not amended or replaced. Five states met in Annapolis, Maryland, to discuss the issue, and all the states were invited to send delegates to a new constitutional convention to be held in Philadelphia.

On May 25, 1787, delegates representing every state except Rhode Island convened at Philadelphia’s Pennsylvania State House for the Constitutional Convention. The building, which is now known as Independence Hall, had earlier seen the drafting of the Declaration of Independence and the signing of the Articles of Confederation. The assembly immediately discarded the idea of amending the Articles of Confederation and set about drawing up a new scheme of government. Revolutionary War hero George Washington, a delegate from Virginia, was elected convention president.

During an intensive debate, the delegates devised a brilliant federal organization characterized by an intricate system of checks and balances. The convention was divided over the issue of state representation in Congress, as more-populated states sought proportional legislation, and smaller states wanted equal representation. The problem was resolved by the Connecticut Compromise, which proposed a bicameral legislature with proportional representation in the lower house (House of Representatives) and equal representation of the states in the upper house (Senate).

On September 17, 1787, the Constitution was signed. As dictated by Article VII, the document would not become binding until it was ratified by nine of the 13 states. Beginning on December 7, five states–Delaware, Pennsylvania, New JerseyGeorgia, and Connecticut–ratified it in quick succession. However, other states, especially Massachusetts, opposed the document, as it failed to reserve undelegated powers to the states and lacked constitutional protection of basic political rights, such as freedom of speech, religion, and the press. In February 1788, a compromise was reached under which Massachusetts and other states would agree to ratify the document with the assurance that amendments would be immediately proposed. The Constitution was thus narrowly ratified in Massachusetts, followed by Maryland and South Carolina. On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the ninth state to ratify the document, and it was subsequently agreed that government under the U.S. Constitution would begin on March 4, 1789. In June, Virginia ratified the Constitution, followed by New York in July.

On September 25, 1789, the first Congress of the United States adopted 12 amendments to the U.S. Constitution–the Bill of Rights–and sent them to the states for ratification. Ten of these amendments were ratified in 1791. In November 1789, North Carolina became the 12th state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. Rhode Island, which opposed federal control of currency and was critical of compromise on the issue of slavery, resisted ratifying the Constitution until the U.S. government threatened to sever commercial relations with the state. On May 29, 1790, Rhode Island voted by two votes to ratify the document, and the last of the original Conn joined the United States. Today, the U.S. Constitution is the oldest written constitution in operation in the world.

New Hampshire Hall of Flags

Located just a few blocks down from Flag-Works over America in Concord,  New Hampshire is the state capital. The building was designed by architect Stuart James Park, and built between the years of 1816-1819. Inside the main lobby area of this historic building is the Hall of Flags formerly known as Doric Hall, which was named and designed after a similar display in the Massachusetts capitol building by Charles Bulfinch.  The halls feature over 100 battle flags carried by New Hampshire soldiers, representing the Civil War, Spanish-American War, WW I,  WW II, and the Vietnam War.  The flags surrounding you go back to  our nations infancy.  Some of these flags are so old that there isn’t barely anything left of them, others are torn and tattered due to going through the riggers of war.

Many of  the flags in the hall are here today because of those who gave their life to protect these flags and what they stand for. All of the flags have a story, and this room is not lacking. Some of the flags are from different states, some are from foreign countries and some are from our country.  It is quite a site to see to be in the same room inches away from a flag that may have been held by such important people like Franklin Pierce the 14th president of the United States and General John Stark, as well as many other people who founded this great country. Just like the men who fought to protect the flag then, we have men and women now who fight to protect our flag today.  Our hope is that one day some of the flags that they fight to protect may be added to this room full of historic flags.

 

Flag Hunter

jhunter@flag-works.com

Massachusetts State Flag

Massachusetts was the 6th state admitted into the country in 1788.

Back of old flag

 

Massachusetts first had a flag that had a different design on each side.   In 1971, the Massachusetts state flag was changed and only depicts the original front design.  It is of a Native American on a blue shield.  He is holding a bow in one hand and an arrow in the other, pointed down to symbolize peace.  A crest above the shield shows an arm bent at the elbow, hand holding a sword.

Massachusetts Flag

This illustrates the Massachusetts state motto, “By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty.”  These top quality Massachusetts Flags are made from heavy-duty, commercial grade outdoor 100% Nylon fabric for maximum durability. All flags are made in America. They are finished with  a strong heading and solid brass grommets for displaying the flag.   Mass state flags are also available in heavy duty polyester for longer life.  Visit Flag-works over America for all your flag needs.